Nonnberg Abbey is a Benedictine monastery in Salzburg founded ca. 714 by Saint Rupert of Salzburg. It is the oldest women's religious house in the German-speaking world. Its first abbess was Saint Erentrudis of Salzburg, who was either a niece or a sister of Saint Rupert.

The abbey was independent of the founding house from 987 and was re-built in about 1000. This building was largely destroyed in a fire of 1423. Reconstruction took place between 1464 and 1509.

The nunnery′s church Maria Himmelfahrt is Salzburg′s oldest church dedicated to the holy Virgin Mary and is one of the most significant churches of the city. It was built in late-gothic style with three naves from 1464 to 1506. In 1624 the church was enlarged by the addition of three side chapels. A refurbishment in the Baroque style took place in the 1880s. The church contains a Romanesque crypt that visitors should note, with the tomb of St. Erentrudis. The entrances to the crypt are in the side-naves.

Through Maria Augusta Kutschera, later Maria Augusta von Trapp, who was a postulant in the abbey after World War I and whose life was the basis for the film The Sound of Music, the abbey has acquired international fame. The Mother Abbess during Maria's time at Nonnberg was Sister Virgilia Lütz (1869-1949).

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Founded: ca. 714 AD
Category: Religious sites in Austria

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Xavier Hamilton (6 months ago)
Awesome history behind this place. Highly recommended a visit.
Anand Subbaiah (6 months ago)
Beautiful view from top.. Best for photographers. Please try out once when you are at salsburg
Sean Hillier (8 months ago)
If you're a sound of music fan then this limited experience is worth the walk. If you have no idea what I'm talking about then I wouldn't go. You only have access to the small chapel on site but the gates as seen in the film are a great photo opportunity.
Aishah Bailey (8 months ago)
Lovely church with great ambiance. Intimate cemetery just outside. Beautiful view from outside. Please keep quiet and be respectful if and when visiting as this is a place of worship.
Olivia H (10 months ago)
We walked up here on the way to see the fortress. It was pretty quiet, free to visit, had some great views, and was overall a nice place to stop. You do have to climb some stairs to get there. I recommend taking this route up to the fortress as well. You’ll save 4 euros each ticket if you walk up instead of taking the funicular up, and it’s not a bad walk.
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