The Isartor is one of four main gates of the medieval city wall. It served as a fortification for the defence and is the most easterly of Munich's three remaining gothic town gates (Isartor, Sendlinger Tor and Karlstor).

The Isartor was constructed in 1337 within the scope of the enlargement of Munich and the construction of the second city wall between 1285 and 1337 which was completed under the Emperor Louis IV. The gate first consisted of a 40 meter high main gate tower. Only with the construction of the moat wall of the gate tower the two flanking side towers were added and served as barbican. The Isartor is today the only medieval gate in Munich which has conserved its medium main tower and the restoration in 1833-35 by Friedrich von Gärtner has recreated the dimensions and appearance close to the original structure. The frescos, created in 1835 by Bernhard von Neher, depict the victorious return of Emperor Louis after the Battle of Mühldorf in 1322.

The Isartor today houses a humorous museum which is dedicated to the comedian and actor Karl Valentin. A café for visitors has been integrated.

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Address

Tal 50, Munich, Germany
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Details

Founded: 1337
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

3.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Johann Fodor (13 months ago)
munchen al doilea localitate din gremania ca si marime. munchen este o metropola merita vizitat sunt multe de vazut....
Gerhard Hofer Immobilienbewertung (14 months ago)
Gute Bäckerei gute Anbindung.
Alex Latunov (2 years ago)
Very weird station: street trains are under the ground. Incredible!
BradJill Travels (2 years ago)
Conveniently located station for S-bahn service to/from the Airport or other destinations around the city. We found the station straight forward, easy access to/from the platforms, just what you are looking for in an easy to use station and with public transportation services
Stan Spin (2 years ago)
Good connections
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