Cologne Synagogue

Cologne, Germany

Since 1899, the neo-Romanesque synagogue on Roonstraße has been the largest religious and cultural centre for the Jewish communities in Cologne. After being burned down by the Nazis on 9 November 1938, the synagogue was rebuilt between 1957 and 1959. The building’s main front has three arched portals and a large gabled façade with a centrally positioned rose window. In 2005 Benedict XVI became the first pope to visit a Jewish house of worship in Germany when he went to the Cologne synagogue during the 10th World Youth Day.

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Details

Founded: 1899
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: German Empire (Germany)

More Information

www.cologne-tourism.com

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jeremy Sulzbacher (3 years ago)
Lovely people
Michael Yamnitsky (4 years ago)
Magnificently restored synagogue of Cologne
David Smith (4 years ago)
The only surviving synagogue in Cologne, originally inaugurated in 1899 and then reconstructed and reopened in 1959. Unfortunately it was closed when I visited. The nearest U-bahn station is Zülpicher Platz.
wwwillekeee (4 years ago)
Beautiful, good guide and very well organized. It was overall very interesting
Paquito (4 years ago)
Same old just another church
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