Cologne Synagogue

Cologne, Germany

Since 1899, the neo-Romanesque synagogue on Roonstraße has been the largest religious and cultural centre for the Jewish communities in Cologne. After being burned down by the Nazis on 9 November 1938, the synagogue was rebuilt between 1957 and 1959. The building’s main front has three arched portals and a large gabled façade with a centrally positioned rose window. In 2005 Benedict XVI became the first pope to visit a Jewish house of worship in Germany when he went to the Cologne synagogue during the 10th World Youth Day.

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Details

Founded: 1899
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: German Empire (Germany)

More Information

www.cologne-tourism.com

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Aydid Traceurman (18 months ago)
(((Safe))) place
Kimberley Dennis (2 years ago)
Beautiful building but if you want to go inside, call in advance. Take passports as security is strict.
Eli Ari Ilan Zamar (2 years ago)
Nice
Olena Opanasenko (3 years ago)
Amazing architecture, great people and a splendid restaurant with Isralien cuisine with pre-order options.
Eli Livshitz (3 years ago)
Beautiful place! Secure yet accessible. Nice!
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