San Miguel Church

Córdoba, Spain

San Miguel is a Roman Catholic church in Córdoba, Andalusia, southern Spain. It is one of the twelve churches built by order of King Ferdinand III of Castile in the city after its conquest in the early 13th century. It was declared a monument of national interest in 1931.

It is an example of transition from the Romanesque to Gothic architecture, although the interior was largely renewed in 1749. It has a nearly square plan, with a nave and two aisles without a transept, a with polygonal apses; the nave has a coffered ceiling.

The main altar, in marble, was built in the 18th century. A side entrance has a horseshoe arch, perhaps dating to the Caliphate age.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Francisco Gomez Fernandez (8 months ago)
Parroquia del centro de cordoba
GERARDO MARTINEZ (8 months ago)
Parroquia muy agradable para lis cultos y el recogimiento.
Jean-Pierre Cochard (9 months ago)
Située en coeur de ville, l'église saint Michel est une des 14 églises, de style gothique et baroque, construites à Cordoue entre le milieu du XIIIe siècle et le début du XIVe siècle, sur ordre de Fernando III (d'où leur nom d'églises Fernandinas). Outre l'aspect spirituel, ces églises avaient également un rôle administratif dans chaque quartier. L'église, qui présente des contreforts romans et une rosace gothique sur la façade, a été modifiée au cours des siècles.
Angel Fuentes (12 months ago)
Ambiente muy agradable, con bares y restaurantes a su alrededor, un pequeño hotel y la capilla. Excelente zona.
Ric Diez (2 years ago)
A nice interesting church
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