SS Sołdek was a Polish coal and ore freighter. She was the first ship built in Poland after World War II and the first seagoing ship completed in Poland. She was the first of 29 ships classed as Project B30, built between 1949 and 1954 in Stocznia Gdańska (Gdańsk Shipyard). The name was given in honour of Stanisław Sołdek, one of the shipyard's shock workers. The ship is currently preserved as a museum ship in Gdańsk.

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Founded: 1949-1954
Category: Museums in Poland

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Marta Kaminska (3 years ago)
Soldek is the first ship build in the Gdansk Shipyard after the Second World War. Soldek is now a part of the National Maritime Museum in Gdansk. Actually it the first ocean-going ship in the history of the Polish shipbuilding industry. Now it is moored on the Motlawa river.
Olivier Grascoeur (4 years ago)
Amazing Combi visit, the ship, museum and granary takes you back in time with wonderful exhibit for kids and adults. A must see!
Andre Gorvel (4 years ago)
Really interesting if your into ships and sea faring, but more could be made of the space.
Pawel Rein (4 years ago)
It's good for a quick visit. May be interesting for kids who never been on a ship before. Would be much better if there were any interactive items there.
Alistair Macleod (4 years ago)
Quite a nice to go around the ship, though there are no translations in English, which is a bit of a shame... The paint has been piled on as opposed to proper maintenance, but interesting nonetheless. Make sure that you wear decent footwear, as you would expect lots of ladders
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