Housed in Gdańsk’s medieval Foregate building (once home to the Prison Tower and Torture Chamber), this multi-story exhibit delves extensively into the history of Baltic amber. The impressive collection of “inclusions” (when bugs or plants are caught inside the amber) is intriguing to look at, and the many amber creations, from inkwells to spoons to a stunning Fender Stratocaster guitar, shows the material’s diversity. A large open room at the top of the building houses an impressive array of modern amber jewellery that appears more artistic than wearable.

Many find the separate exhibits on the building’s past as a torture chamber uncomfortable – and considering the piped-in soundtrack of pained cries, we understand why – but they are a must-see, if for no other reason to find out what “thumb screwing” and a “heretic’s fork” are. Many of the exhibit rooms throughout the ancient building are small and cramped, and if you happen to visit on the same day as a school group it’s a nightmare.

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Category: Museums in Poland

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Krzysztof Bona (ChrisCBona) (9 months ago)
What I loved there is a Fender Stratocaster in Amber. Nice touch. You could not take photos there so I don't have one but the experience was very good and pleased my eyes. So many talented people who did those useful and decorative amber goodies. If you want to see and read everything it could take up to 2 hours. But if you not in hurry and read only bigger descriptions you could see everything in an hour.
Rachel C (10 months ago)
A beautifully set-out museum and very informative. Sadly the interactive displays were not on due to Covid-19, so we didn't get the full experience. But it costs less than €5 for entry, so it was fine.
Frank Milloni (10 months ago)
Overwhelmingly reflective surfaces everywhere. The exhibits, however, we're interesting and informative. Everything you ever needed to know about amber.
Piotr Staniów (11 months ago)
It has quite adorable collection and there was plenty of stunning pieces of amber. Yet, little did I learn here as the descriptions were scarce, and some pieces were at best described as "block of amber". I wish there was more about history (e.g. to whom did amber chess or desk belong, what's their history) and about amber itself (extraction, processing, etc). There's not much going on there.
Ceylon Pitt (11 months ago)
Interesting place to learn more about Amber and so many samples as showcase. The best part for me is the architecture of the place. It was used to be an old grand mill. U can see the picture and model of the space what it looked like in the past.
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