Housed in Gdańsk’s medieval Foregate building (once home to the Prison Tower and Torture Chamber), this multi-story exhibit delves extensively into the history of Baltic amber. The impressive collection of “inclusions” (when bugs or plants are caught inside the amber) is intriguing to look at, and the many amber creations, from inkwells to spoons to a stunning Fender Stratocaster guitar, shows the material’s diversity. A large open room at the top of the building houses an impressive array of modern amber jewellery that appears more artistic than wearable.

Many find the separate exhibits on the building’s past as a torture chamber uncomfortable – and considering the piped-in soundtrack of pained cries, we understand why – but they are a must-see, if for no other reason to find out what “thumb screwing” and a “heretic’s fork” are. Many of the exhibit rooms throughout the ancient building are small and cramped, and if you happen to visit on the same day as a school group it’s a nightmare.

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Category: Museums in Poland

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Rachel C (40 days ago)
A beautifully set-out museum and very informative. Sadly the interactive displays were not on due to Covid-19, so we didn't get the full experience. But it costs less than €5 for entry, so it was fine.
Frank Milloni (51 days ago)
Overwhelmingly reflective surfaces everywhere. The exhibits, however, we're interesting and informative. Everything you ever needed to know about amber.
Ceylon Pitt (2 months ago)
Interesting place to learn more about Amber and so many samples as showcase. The best part for me is the architecture of the place. It was used to be an old grand mill. U can see the picture and model of the space what it looked like in the past.
Narasimha PG (2 months ago)
If you are planning to visit, Wednesday is free from entry fee. The place is great and you can spend an hour or two. You will find descriptions in both in polish and English. It is written that cannot take photos but the guy who works there said can take without flash.
Robert Teunissen (3 months ago)
The new location of the amber museum was much better than I thought it would be. First floor contains raw materials, second floor crafted and sculpted amber. Worth your while!
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