The Upland Gate was built along with the surrounding fortifications between 1571-1576. Formerly, it was the main entrance to the town. The western embankment (built up in 1573) was equipped with a basic looking brick gate building, initially devoid of any kind of decoration. It should be emphasised that this was the first gate in Gdánsk built according to the latest fortification techniques at that time. Credit for the design and overseeing of such a major defense project should be given to Hans Kramer from Dresden.

The gate, surrounded by imposing embankments was indeed difficult to break through. Opposite the main access route stood a bridge spanning a rather deep moat designed for transportation. Two other entrances were equipped with footbridges for pedestrians. A portcullis was raised at certain times in the evening.

In 1588, a brick facade was imaginatively put in by the famous sculptor Wilhelm Van Den Blocke. He created a mural composed of sculpted leaves. The imposing crest sculpture also draws the attention of tourists, on top of the main entrance is the emblem of the Republic on an oval shield held up by two angels.

In front of the Upland Gate were held ceremonies to greet Polish monarchs who visited the town. It should be noted that the first Polish leader who passed through the gate in its present form was Zygmunt III Waza.

During the second world war 1939-45, the gate suffered only minor damages and that is why today we can see this building in all its glory.

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Founded: 1571-1576
Category: Castles and fortifications in Poland

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Atte Grönroos (18 months ago)
Met our new best friend in town here. Local guide who showed us things we would never have experienced otherwise. Great story to tell in the future. Zura if you're reading this, we'll see next summer for sure!
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